• fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session#19 - Double Dragon

      1 year ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is RingtoneAttack!  I’ll be bringing you the highest quality, classic video game ringtones for all your mobile phone devices!

      I can remember playing Double Dragon at the Golfland down the street from my house as a kid.  Double Dragon appealed to me quite a bit not only because of my interest in martial arts, but my participation in martial arts, specifically Shotokan Karate, as well.  It was a great game and a tough one at that, and one that took many a quarter on my frequent weekend excursions to the arcade.  The NES port was certainly no different in the difficulty.

      One of the biggest disappointments of the NES version though, was the omission of the two-player co-op mode from the arcade. This was due in part to the inexperience of the programmers with the NES hardware, as well as other technical limitations that were not worked around by the Technos team.  Two-player co-op being one of the best things about beat ’em ups, and it’s a real shame that the team couldn’t get co-op into the game, despite being able to do so with all other iterations on the NES.

      Still, Double Dragon on the NES is a fantastic game despite it’s differences from the arcade.  The game play is as fun and challenging and the music, in my opinion, is even better than in the arcade.  Even today, I still have difficulty performing some of the special moves, like the Pin Attack and the Hair-Pull Kick.  My favorite is the Elbow Punch though.  It’s the best way to deal with Abobo and kills most other enemies in two or less hits.

      Something I never noticed until I started working on the ringtones for this session that I thought was funny is that the instruction booklet actually gives away the identity of the surprise final boss stating, “… he is secretly the Shadow Boss, mysterious leader of the Black Warriors.”  Not much of a “secret” apparently.  If you don’t know, in the arcade version, the original final boss is Willy.  However, in the NES version, you defeat Willy, and THEN there’s final battle, and the instruction manual just gives it away.

      All right everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR your ringtone downloads!  SO CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 17
      Sound Effects - 20

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session #19 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the blog and post COMMENTS below sharing YOUR experiences with Double Dragon.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions!

      RingtoneAttack is now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER!  Help SUPPORT the blog by clicking the images below to LIKE and FOLLOW.

       

      So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
    • fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session#20 - Double Dragon II: The Revenge

      1 year ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is

       

      I’ll be bringing you the highest quality, classic video game ringtones for all your mobile phone devices!

      I mentioned last session that one of the biggest disappointments of the first NES Double Dragon was the omission of the two-player co-op mode from the arcade.  So when Double Dragon II: The Revenge was released the following year, I was excited to see that this had been corrected.  Getting to play with a friend was SO much more enjoyable than having to take turns.  However, playing with a friend doesn’t make Double Dragon II any easier, as the difficultly level returns in spectacular fashion.

      The most difficult part of this game is the platforming.  “MISSION 6: Mansion of Terror” and “MISSION 7: Trap Room (Dungeon of the Mansion)”, have particularly nasty segments where you have to navigate a series of disappearing platforms of various sizes or, a combination of moving gears and platforms, all over a floor of spikes that will kill you instantly.  Your timing has to be spot on or you’re falling into those spikes and losing a life.  There’s no continues either.  So if you mess up and game over, you have to start from the beginning and work your way back just to take another stab at it.

      The enemies in the game aren’t too terribly difficult to defeat though.  I find stunning them with a few punches (usually 3) then grabbing their hair and kneeing them repeatedly in the face (called noggin knockers in the instruction manual for some dumb reason) to be the most effective way of dealing with them.  Bosses like Burnov, Abore, and Bolo can be dealt with by simply performing one or two back kicks from a safe distance then moving down or up slightly on the screen.   The boss at the end of “MISSION 8: The Double Illusion”, Doppelganger, is particularly annoying, as he’ll disappear then reappear inside your body and do damage to you if you’re on the ground when he reappears.

      Also, don’t bother trying to do the special moves spinning cyclone, hyper uppercut, and high jump kick/knee.  The instruction manual uses terms like “exact or split second timing” and “precise moment” when describing how to perform these attacks… and that’s exactly what they mean.  You’ll literally need to have frame perfect timing to execute these moves, and they’re just not worth it, as you’ll find yourself taking more damage trying to execute the moves then just beating enemies up normally in the first place.

      All right everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR your ringtone downloads!  SO CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 25
      Sound Effects - 37

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session #20 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the blog and post COMMENTS below sharing YOUR experiences with Double Dragon II.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions! 

      RingtoneAttack is now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER!  Help SUPPORT the blog by clicking the images below to LIKE and FOLLOW.

       

      So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
       
    • fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session #18 - Super C

      1 year ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is RingtoneAttack!  I’ll be bringing you the highest quality, classic video game ringtones for all your mobile phone devices!

      Super C is the sequel to Contra on the NES, and of the two games, Super C is definitely more difficult.  For starters, the infamous Konami Code was not included in the sequel.  Instead, there’s a different input code to enter on the title screen, Right, Left, Down, Up, A, B then Start.  This would give you 10 lives instead of the accustomed 30.   The number of enemies and hazards dramatically increased as well.  Trying to keep track of all the shit flying, moving, and popping out on the screen created more opportunities for you to lose track of a stray bullet or forget about a certain hazard.  Fortunately, the weapons you have at your disposal have been improved to compensate for this.

      While the Spread Gun still maintains its “kill everything in its path” reputation, it isn’t the end all, be all for your weapon choices.  The Flame Thrower has been improved dramatically, and goes from a spiraling wheel of useless flame in Contra, to a huge, overpowered, single shot fireball that explodes into smaller fireballs when it collides with surfaces and can be charged for even more destructive damage in Super C.  It is BY FAR, the best weapon to use for the side scrolling levels.  The Spread Gun still works great, but if you have the opportunity to switch, DO IT.  The exception is the vertical scrolling levels.  It’s here where the Spread Gun really out classes the Flame Thrower.  Otherwise, Flame Thrower is the way to go, hands down.

      The music in Super C is good and goes great the gameplay, however, it’s not as great or as memorable as that of Contra’s soundtrack.  Regardless, it still puts you in the mood for killing evil aliens, and you can’t ask for much more then that.

      Alright everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR, your ringtone downloads!  SO CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 20
      Sound Effects - 25

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session #18 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the blog and post COMMENTS below sharing YOUR experiences with Super C.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions!

      RingtoneAttack is now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER!  Help SUPPORT the blog by clicking the images below to LIKE and FOLLOW.

       

      So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
    • fabio73

      _TEST2

      2 years ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is

       

      I’ll be bringing you the highest quality, classic video game ringtones for all your mobile phone devices!

      I mentioned last session that one of the biggest disappointments of the first NES Double Dragon was the omission of the two-player co-op mode from the arcade.  So when Double Dragon II: The Revenge was released the following year, I was excited to see that this had been corrected.  Getting to play with a friend was SO much more enjoyable than having to take turns.  However, playing with a friend doesn’t make Double Dragon II any easier, as the difficultly level returns in spectacular fashion.

      The most difficult part of this game is the platforming.  “MISSION 6: Mansion of Terror” and “MISSION 7: Trap Room (Dungeon of the Mansion)”, have particularly nasty segments where you have to navigate a series of disappearing platforms of various sizes or, a combination of moving gears and platforms, all over a floor of spikes that will kill you instantly.  Your timing has to be spot on or you’re falling into those spikes and losing a life.  There’s no continues either.  So if you mess up and game over, you have to start from the beginning and work your way back just to take another stab at it.

      The enemies in the game aren’t too terribly difficult to defeat though.  I find stunning them with a few punches (usually 3) then grabbing their hair and kneeing them repeatedly in the face (called noggin knockers in the instruction manual for some dumb reason) to be the most effective way of dealing with them.  Bosses like Burnov, Abore, and Bolo can be dealt with by simply performing one or two back kicks from a safe distance then moving down or up slightly on the screen.   The boss at the end of “MISSION 8: The Double Illusion”, Doppelganger, is particularly annoying, as he’ll disappear then reappear inside your body and do damage to you if you’re on the ground when he reappears.

      Also, don’t bother trying to do the special moves spinning cyclone, hyper uppercut, and high jump kick/knee.  The instruction manual uses terms like “exact or split second timing” and “precise moment” when describing how to perform these attacks… and that’s exactly what they mean.  You’ll literally need to have frame perfect timing to execute these moves, and they’re just not worth it, as you’ll find yourself taking more damage trying to execute the moves then just beating enemies up normally in the first place.

      All right everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR your ringtone downloads!  SO CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 25
      Sound Effects - 37

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session #20 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the blog and post COMMENTS below sharing YOUR experiences with Double Dragon II.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions! 

      RingtoneAttack is now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER!  Help SUPPORT the blog by clicking the images below to LIKE and FOLLOW.

       

      So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
       
    • fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session #14 - Mega Man III

      2 years ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is RingtoneAttack!  I’ll be bringing you the highest quality classic video game ringtones on the internet for all your mobile phone devices, and this week we have ringtones for the NES title, Mega Man III.

      Mega Man III, like its predecessor, continued to evolve the gameplay forward with the introduction of three new staples, the slide maneuver, the robot dog Rush, and Proto Man.

      Sliding was a great new mechanic because it allowed Mega Man to traverse more quickly through stages and navigate through lower obstacles.  Sliding also provided a new way to engage or avoid enemies, making the combat a bit more engaging and tactical then just jumping and shooting.

      Rush, your cute robot dog companion, was a replacement for the Items 1, 2, and 3, from Mega Man II, and like Mega Man II, Rush would gain new abilities after completing certain stages.  Rush’s abilities included Rush Coil, which allowed Mega Man to jump higher, Rush Jet, which allowed for flying over enemies and obstacles, and Rush Marine, which allowed for traveling underwater.  Unlike Mega Man II however, not all of Rush’s abilities were useful.

      Rush Marine was by far the least useful ability in Rush’s arsenal as there were only a few parts of the game that had underwater segments, and trying to use Rush Marine on land was like trying to use the Frog Suit from Super Mario Bros. 3 in the same way… it makes the item completely useless.

      Then there’s Proto Man, a mysterious mini-boss character that you fight periodically throughout the game and has the most predictable boss pattern ever.  Once you defeated him, he would teleport away clearing the path for you to move on.  Proto Man’s most memorable characteristic was his iconic whistle that would play every time before you engaged him in battle.  It wasn’t until the end of the game that you learned who he really was, and even then, it’s never fully clear as to what motivated his actions.

      The most surprising things in Mega Man III for me, other than the ending, was the fact that you had to face all 8 of the robot masters from Mega Man II after you defeated the 8 master robots in Mega Man III.  Spark, Needle, Shadow, and Gemini Man’s stages were altered, increasing their difficulty through changes in the terrain and the number of enemies, and Mega Man would have to defeat 2 of the Mega Man II master robots in each stage.  This was definitely a cool twist and it was a lot of fun to go through more challenging versions of Spark, Needle, Shadow, and Gemini Man’s stages.  My only complaint is that this should have been done to all of Mega Man III’s stages with Mega Man defeating only one master robot at the end.

      Alright everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR, your ringtone downloads!  SO CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 41
      Sound Effects - 30

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session # 14 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the blog and post COMMENTS below sharing your experiences with Mega Man III.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions too!

      RingtoneAttack is now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER!  Help SUPPORT the blog by clicking the images below to LIKE and FOLLOW.

       

      So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
    • fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session #15 - Mega Man IV

      2 years ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is RingtoneAttack!  I'll be bringing you the highest quality classic video game ringtones on the internet for all your mobile phone devices!  In this session of RingtoneAttack, we have ringtones for the NES title, Mega Man IV.

      Mega Man IV while still a solid entry to the series didn’t introduce much in the way of gameplay improvements as previous entries had done.  In all honesty, there was really only one TRUE improvement to the gameplay.  However, it’s one that once introduced, made me question why this mechanic hadn’t been introduced much sooner… the Mega Buster!

      The Mega Buster was essentially a… Mega, version of Mega Man’s arm cannon, and allowed him to fire a charged blast when you held down the B button for a short period of time then released it.  This single addition completely changed how you engaged enemies.  Instead of navigating across the screen, frantically mashing the B button, you could now be much more strategic with your shooting, slowing down the pace of combat and allowing you to destroy most enemies in a single, well placed shot.

      For me, this also increased the tension in the game, because I was determined to destroy EVERY… SINGLE… ENEMY, using the Mega Buster’s charged shot, and missing a shot with several enemies on the screen can lead to a very stressful situation indeed.

      Rush returns as your cute robot dog companion with the same abilities from Mega Man III, Rush Coil, Rush Jet, and Rush Marine, but you’re also introduced to a new robot pal by the name of Eddie/Flip Top.  During certain parts of the game, Eddie would appear and give Mega Man a random item.  These could be as common as energy or ammunition, or even rarer items like Mega Man’s face or energy tanks.

      Mega Man IV also introduced us to a new villain, a Russian scientist named Dr. Cossack.  Hailing himself as the greatest robot designer in the world, he challenges Dr. Light by sending eight of his most powerful robots to destroy the “titanium troublemaker”, Mega Man.  Only then does Dr. Cossack believe that he will be allowed to take his place as the greatest robot designer of all time.

      While Mega Man IV is definitely a turning point in the 8-bit series in terms of quality, I still find it as good as Mega Man III.  One of the most common complaints I’ve read as well as heard from friends, is that the Mega Buster is too overpowered, rendering many of the Master Robot weapons useless.  I would disagree, and say that this is no different than any other of the previous Mega Man titles even with the inclusion of the Mega Buster.

      In EVERY Mega Man game, you usually have a one or two, maybe three, Master Robot weapons that are very versatile and can be used frequently throughout the game, with the remaining weapons only being used in a select number of situations or even just for a single Master Robot fight.  Having the Mega Buster doesn’t change that.

      Besides, the Mega Buster’s charge shot only does three health points of damage as opposed to a single shot which does one.  Not really an overpowered weapon if you ask me.  I feel the addition of the Mega Buster even adds a risk/reward system to the gameplay.  Do you fire more shots at the cost of doing less damage per shot, or do you do more damage at the cost of firing less shots and risking taking more damage by enemies if you miss.  If you really want an example of an overpowered Master Robot weapon, look no further than the Metal Blade from Mega Man II.  Now THAT’S… OP!!  We don’t hear anybody complaining about that weapon though… do we?

      Alright everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR, your ringtone downloads!  SO CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 40
      Sound Effects - 33

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session #15 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the blog and post COMMENTS below sharing YOUR experiences with Mega Man IV.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions!

      RingtoneAttack is now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER!  Help SUPPORT the blog by clicking the images below to LIKE and FOLLOW.

       

      So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
    • fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session #16 - Final Fantasy

      2 years ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is RingtoneAttack!  I’ll be bringing you the highest quality classic video game ringtones on the internet for all your mobile phone devices!  In this session of RingtoneAttack, I bring you ringtones for the NES title, Mega Man IV.

      Before collecting GIL ever became a problem, a little known Japanese company named Square was having financial troubles of its own.  In 1987, they began facing off against another worldly evil known as bankruptcy.
       
      With the resources for one last effort, Square’s director of planning and development, Hironobu Sakaguchi, was given the terrifying task of making a game that could save Square’s dwindling future in the industry.  When asked what type of game he would like to make, he replied:
       
      “I don’t think I have what it takes to make a good action game. I think I’m better at telling a story.”
       
      Sakaguchi dreamt of a video game with an immense world map to explore, and an engaging tale to tell.  Convinced the Famicom RPG would be his swan song, he ironically named it… Final Fantasy.
       
       

      Final Fantasy was released in Japan in December of 1987, and in the US 3 years later in July of 1990.  It was the first role-playing game I ever played and the one that made me a fan of the genre.

      Volume 17 of Nintendo Power is what first got me excited to play Final Fantasy, as the magazine had devoted an entire issue to the game in the form of a strategy guide.  I received my copy of Final Fantasy that same year in December for Christmas, and I couldn’t wait to open the game up and pop it into my NES. 

      The first party I ever ventured out with consisted of a Fighter, Black Belt, Black Mage, and White Mage.  I can’t remember what I named everyone with the exception of the White Mage who I named, SEXY, because I thought the White Mage was a girl.  Once I had I chosen and named my party, I went into town, bought some weapons and armor for the party, spells for my mages, a couple of heals, then headed back out to the over world to start fighting some baddies.

      My first battle with a group of Imps was a disaster!  I didn’t understand the concept of equipping your equipment, so I went into battle having thought that as long as the equipment was with that particular party member, then they would be able to use it in battle.  NOPE!  So instead of attacking Imps with the weapons I just purchased, I’m attacking them with my fists.  I tried using the weapons as items as well but that was useless too, as the weapons in Cornelia don’t cast magic (of course I didn’t know this at the time either).  I eventually figured out how to equip my weapons and armor but those first few battles were frustrating and rough.

      I played Final Fantasy multiple times throughout my childhood but never completed it.  It wasn’t until I started college that I finally decided to sit down and actually complete the game from start to finish.  I had just discovered GameFAQs.com around that same time and had found a great Final Fantasy FAQ. I proceeded to print it out, put all the pages in plastic sleeves, and placed them into a 1” binder with separators labeling the different sections.  I still have the binder to this day.

      Alright everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR, your ringtone downloads!  SO CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 23
      Sound Effects - 4

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session # 16 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to SUBSCRIBE to the blog and post COMMENTS below sharing YOUR experiences with Final Fantasy.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions!

      RingtoneAttack is now on FACEBOOK and TWITTER!  Help SUPPORT the blog by clicking the images below to LIKE and FOLLOW.

       

      So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
    • fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session # 10 - Castlevania II: Simon's Quest

      2 years ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is RingtoneAttack!  I’ll be bringing you the highest quality video game ringtones on the internet for all your mobile phone devices!

      Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest, like Super Mario Bros. 2 and Zelda II: The Adventure of Link, is often considered the black sheep of the Castlevania series on the NES.  I will assume that we’ve all seen the Angry Video Game Nerd’s review of Simon’s Quest, so there’s really no need in pointing out the annoying aspects of the game.  Regardless of its flaws though, the dramatic style changes in game play are still pretty solid, adding role-playing elements similar to that of Zelda II, and the music, composed by Kenich Matsubara, is outstanding, debuting one of the franchises best recurring songs, Bloody Tears.

      Simon’s Quest also received criticism from its Nintendo Power Issue 2 cover which displays Simon Belmont standing like a bad ass holding Dracula’s severed head.  Apparently some kids who purchased the issue started to have nightmares and parents actually called Nintendo to complain about the graphic nature of the cover.  I can’t help but laugh whenever I think about this because if you’ve seen the cover, it’s really not that scary.

      I never played Simon’s Quest growing up and it wasn’t until I started making the ringtones that I really sat down to play through the game; as playing the game is the best way to figure out which sound effects are which.  I owned the NES Game Atlas Player’s Guide though, and I would always be looking at the pictures, memorizing the maps/paths, and studying all the information provided even though I didn’t own it.  Continually looking through my Nintendo Power magazines and strategy guides was my way of preparing for the day I would finally get to play it, and many other games.  Like The Guardian Legend, making ringtones gives me that extra incentive to sit down and play the games that I missed out on as a kid; although I really shouldn’t need the incentive at all.

      Alright everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR, your ringtone downloads!  CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 12
      Sound Effects - 32

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session # 10 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to subscribe and post comments below sharing your experiences with Castlevania II: Simon's Quest.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions too!  So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
    • fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session # 13 - Mega Man II

      2 years ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is RingtoneAttack!  I’ll be bringing you the highest quality classic video game ringtones on the internet for all your mobile phone devices, and this week we have ringtones for the GREATEST NES sequel of all time, Mega Man II.

      As I mentioned in Session #12, Mega Man II was the first game in the Mega Man series I ever played.  Anyone who’s played both Mega Man I and II could easily notice the vast improvements Mega Man II had made to its gameplay, controls, graphics, and music, in the best-selling title of the entire Mega Man franchise.  It’s the one I played the most growing up, mostly in part to it being the only copy of a Mega Man game on the NES that I personally owned during that time, and ranks as my favorite Mega Man game on the NES. 

      Of all the improvements made from Mega Man to Mega Man II, the most noticeable improvement for me is definitely its music, and Mega Man II is one phenomenal soundtrack.  Granted, the Mega Man games on the NES, and the franchise as a whole, are well known for their great and memorable soundtracks, nevertheless, Mega Man II’s soundtrack just stands out above of the rest of the NES titles.  It’s like looking at the difference in the graphics between Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy VIII. 

      Final Fantasy VII’s graphics was Square Enix, at that time known as Squaresoft, learning what the hardware on the Sony Playstation could do and building a solid foundation.  When it came time to start work on Final Fantasy VIII, Square Enix was able to build on that foundation and push the hardware even further, with Final Fantasy XI being the culmination of that learning pushing the hardware even more.  The same is true for CAPCOM and Mega Man II.  Mega Man was CAPCOM building that solid foundation with Mega Man II being where they really applied what they had learned, and with the sales of Mega Man I being “unimpressive” and not really justifying a sequel, it’s easy to imagine the Mega Man team taking everything they had learned and seeing just how they could really improve the game as much as possible, even with the stipulation that they had to work on other projects while working on Mega Man II.

      Every track is filled with 8-bit goodness with my favorite track being Bubble Man’s Stage.  I could listen to that all day long.  Yes, Dr. Wily Stage 1 is really good too, but Bubble Man’s Stage I like just a bit more. It starts off kind of haunting yet upbeat then drops into the main chorus that fits the atmosphere of the stage perfectly.  Bubble Man is kind of a joke as far as Robot Masters are concerned, but his stage music is anything but.

      Even though Mega Man II is my favorite Mega Man game on the NES, it’s NOT my favorite of the entire franchise.  That title goes to Mega Man X on the Super Nintendo.

      Alright everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR, your ringtone downloads!  CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 35
      Sound Effects - 31

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That wraps up Session # 13 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to subscribe to the blog and post comments below sharing your experiences with Mega Man II.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions too! 

      RingtoneAttack is now on Facebook and Twitter!  Click the images below to Like and Follow.

      So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
       
    • fabio73

      RingtoneAttack - Session # 12 - Mega Man

      2 years ago

      WELCOME g1s!  I’m fabio73, and THIS… is RingtoneAttack!  I’ll be bringing you the highest quality video game ringtones on the Internet for all your mobile phone devices, and this week we have ringtones for the NES title, (fans of the cartoon show, sing along) do do do dooooo… SUPER FIGHTING ROBOT… DO DO DO DOOOOO… MEGA MAN! 

      Similar to my experience playing Castlevania III: Dracula’s Curse before playing the original Castlevania, Mega Man II was the first game in the Mega Man series I played followed shortly after by Mega Man.  If your exposure to the series was similar to mine, you probably realized how much more difficult Mega Man is in comparison to Mega Man II. Now, that’s not to say Mega Man II is easy, on the contrary, Mega Man II can be difficult even without selecting the “Difficult” setting on the title screen, however, there’s no denying that Mega Man only has one difficulty setting… DIFFICULT!

      How many times did you die on those moving platforms in Guts Man’s stage?  I have those platforms mastered today, but growing up they were the bane of my existence.  Then I get to Guts Man and I still manage to get caught in his ground pound earthquake.  I know how to avoid it (jump just before he lands then jump to avoid the block he throws) but I always get frantic and jump just a little too early and get caught by it and then it’s a pain to recover.  Then there’s Ice Man who can destroy you with only three shots with his Ice Slasher, Fire Man’s Fire Storm attack which is a wall of fire that comes at you as fast as Quick Man and is as much a pain to avoid as Guts Man’s ground pound earthquake, and the Yellow Devil, who’s fight is a test of timing and patience even with using Thunder Beam.  Plus, this is the only Mega Man game not to feature a password system.  So if you want to beat the game, you have to do it from start to finish.  Not really difficult as you get unlimited continues but still takes getting used to if you’ve played other games in the series before the original. 

      Despite its difficulties you never get discouraged, only more determined, and that’s one of the Mega Man series' greatest qualities.  Now throw in solid controls, memorable characters, a rock-paper-scissors battle system, and music so phenomenal that it blows your clothes off, and you have a combination for epicness!!

      Alright everybody!  It’s time FOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOR, your ringtone downloads!  CLICK THE MUSIC!

       
       
       
      DOWNLOAD DETAILS
      Tracks - 23
      Sound Effects - 33

       

      iPhone Downloads

      ALAC (Apple Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      iTunes AAC (Advanced Audio Coding)

      Stereo Bit Rate: 192 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Channels: Stereo
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      Android and FLAC/MP3 enabled mobile device Downloads

      FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec)

      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Audio Bit Depth: 16 Bit Stereo

      LAME MP3 (MPEG-1 Audio Layer III)

      Estimated Bit Rate: 190 kbps
      Sample Rate: 44.100 kHz
      Encoding: Slow (High Quality)
      Variable Bit Rate Encoding (VBR)

       

      That about wraps up Session # 12 of RingtoneAttack!  Be sure to subscribe and post comments below sharing your experiences with Mega Man.   Also, let me know what NES titles you’d like to see in upcoming sessions too!  So until next time g1’s…

      I’m fabio73, and THAT... was
  • About Me

    I'm fabio73, and I LOVE ScrewAttack and making video game ringtones!

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